Monday, January 28, 2013

Dear Nigerian in Diaspora by Atilola Moronfolu

Source


Note before reading: This letter is in no way generalising all Nigerians in diaspora, so please, don't take offence  If you are guilty of the points mentioned here, i.e. sapping the hope of Nigerians in Nigeria  then you are the one I am addressing this letter to.



Dear Nigerian in Diaspora,

Time and time again, you have justified your reason for leaving our fatherland. Or is it motherland? You said it is because you want to give your children a better life and opportunity than you had. We accepted your reason, as looking at the current state of our nation, we see every validity in your reason. We therefore did not trouble you or hassle you over that decision.
Just like we did not hassle you over this decision, we would like you to reciprocate this gesture by not hassling us over our decision to stay back.

Dear NID, I have noticed that the way you talk about issues pertaining to our country is far different from the way we here take it. Have you ever wondered why the tone of your comments about this country is far different from the tones of the Nigerians in Nigeria? Once there is a tragic event, you have a way of blowing it over the top, exaggerating, and wondering what our dear country is turning to. If only you reacted this way to every good thing that happened in our country, maybe the western world won’t always present a single story about us in their press.


Your comments of “I can never send my children to Nigeria on a holiday because they would either be robbed, kidnapped or used for rituals,” doesn’t really sound encouraging, especially as you have never suggested one solution to this problem we are facing. Please tell me, what percentage of the ones who came here last holiday were subject to this cruel fate you imagine?

But Dear NID, I begin to wonder

Why are you always the one to point out just how bad our country is to us, as if we are too blind to see it?

Why are you the one that always hammer on the fact that we here are the stupidly religious ones? That we all follow our pastors like blind fools? Please, let the people that want to buy jets for their pastors do so. As you have tied your hope to the white man giving you a better life, they have also tied their hope to their pastors giving them miracles, since many of them would never have the opportunity to leave this side of the world. After all, they learnt it from the numerous pastors in America, who also bought private jets from money they got from televangelism and offerings too. Our pastors still have a long way to go when it comes to acquiring private jets.

Why are you always the first to mention how you don't see Nigeria ever getting better, how you lost hope in Nigeria a long time ago? We know about your lost hope, your exit already tells us that much.

Why are you the one who dismisses songs of hope in Nigeria, such as Great Nation by Timi Dakolo, The Future is here by TY Bello, etc. as wishful thinking? Just because you have lost hope in our country doesn't mean you should try to kill the hope of those left.

You have left, fine! Your children and grandchildren would probably never visit Nigeria in their life time, fine! We don’t have an issue with that, it’s your family, you can do whatever you like with them. You have said over and over again how you don’t care for Nigeria and her issues anymore. Yes, we get that. Since that is the case, we expect you to follow suit with your words, and really NOT care again, by forgetting that Nigeria exists in your dictionary. Or does the fact that you can’t stop talking and complaining about Nigeria despite the fact that you claim not to care really mean that your ‘care-less’ statements are not true? Selah

Dear NID, you should know that not all of us have the opportunity to leave like you, and even when some of us do, we just don't want to. We have chosen to stay. We were not forced to stay, we chose to. Live with your choice and let us live with ours.

Dear NID, even if you have stopped believing in Nigeria, and do not see yourself ever returning here, can you please stop asking us to do the same? Can you please, stop expecting us to stop hoping that we would get better, just because you stopped hoping? Cos unfortunately, some of us have nowhere else to go, and no matter how many people leave, some of us here still have to stay back, and make Nigeria good again.

Dear NID, you forget that when your family is bad, and you choose to run to another family because they are good, it won’t solve the problem of the ‘badness’ of your family. Your family will still be bad. Selah

Dear NID, why is it that whenever I ask you about the solution to this country you claim you do not care about, but can never stop talking about, you tell me the only solution is to split? Unity or splitting - which of the options would cost more? Are you ready to sacrifice the remaining family you left here to the unavoidable bloodshed that would happen if your splitting fantasies ever became a reality (no pun intended)? Wait no, you would move all of them out of the country and make them fellow NIDs like you - another fantasy that would never become a reality, thanks to the white man who would rather die than see that happen.

Nigeria is a big menace and it is like a time bomb waiting to explode, with the injustice, corruption, insecurities, and other negative nouns I would not even bother to mention, but rather leave for the political bloggers and writers to deal with. One thing we know is this, in no way would leaving the country ever solve all the migraine-generating problems of our country. But as we have said before, we don’t have any problem with the choice you made. After all, there is the fight or flight approach to be taken in any battle. You chose the flight, while we chose the former.

It is okay that you have decided to have as little as possible to do with us, but please, live and let live. Don’t tell me to shut up when I say something good can still come out of Nigeria – I will still say it. Don’t try to take away the hope we have left with your comments of how failed and hopeless we are. Hoping in this k-leg country of ours is very difficult, and we should be encouraged and commended for doing so. In the face of the unexplainable nonsense our leaders put us through in this country, our hope is honestly the only thing we have. Take that away from us, and we had better started committing suicide because a hopeless person is a walking-dead.

And if you are a NID because your parents stole our commonwealth, sent you out to have a better life, and you in turn, pay us back by trying to kill our spirit with your hope-sucking statements, thereby making me spend time to write this letter which would most likely generate comments I would rather not deal with, my way, well… since I have no power to do anything to you, I leave you for God to judge. That is not because I am meek like Moses, it is because I really have no power to do anything to you – at least, for now.

Dear NID, in spite of all the nonsense happening in every sector of the country, you can call me deluded, but I still say Nigeria has a great future. Okay, I said it. Come and flog me. Oh I forgot, you would have to come down to Nigeria to do that.

Dear NID, I think I should stop here for now, as I strongly suspect that I am beginning to ramble.

Yours sincerely,

Nigerian in Nigeria

Atilola Moronfolu

66 comments:

  1. post on point...nothing more to add.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? Maybe u'll come back and add later

      Delete
  2. *standing ovation* BRAVO! BRA-V0! Excellente! *oya! start dodging the bullets that will soon be flying!..ahahahaha

    Like I always tell you @tilola, you write so well and express your passion in words....I do feel it!

    Many times I hold myself from writing back scathing comments whenever I come across such comments because I have no strength and time to waste on ungainful arguements AGAIN!(i don repent :D

    Nigeria is a unique country.
    We have something in us that keeps the energy so alive and flowing regardless of our poverty in EVERYTHING.
    Yes! The advanced countries have all the comforts of life but there are some things missing which cannot be described in words until you experience it.
    I pray Nigeria would NEVER split up.
    And as for religion, I always say, it is personal, as the bible admonishes us to work out our own salvation with trembling and fear. Don't shove your beliefs down my throat!

    A very interesting and thought provoking post @tilola.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the compliment ma'am. I pray we would never split up o. It won't even be funny at all. The thought of splitting and war is what can make me run away from here and become NID.

      Delete
  3. Nigeria's situation is bad. Very bad. Sometimes it is only when you have lived or live in a system that works that you gain a profound appreciation for the magnitude of Nigeria's woes. Si please call me guilty. Yes, I am guilty of some of the things you have described. But with good reason.

    Now about some of the points you made:

    1)"Nigeria is a big menace and it is like a time bomb waiting to explode, with the injustice, corruption, insecurities, and other negative nouns I would not even bother to mention, but rather leave for the political bloggers and writers to deal with."

    This statement exemplifies a huge aspect of the problem. What is the point in calling ourselves a democracy if ordinary citizens do not utilize their right to express their views about their country? Why should we leave it to political bloggers or writers? The biggest change in Nigeria will come when "WE THE PEOPLE" take action and demand more from our leadership. We cannot leave that up to political bloggers and writers.

    2.)"Why are you the one that always hammer on the fact that we here are the stupidly religious ones? That we all follow our pastors like blind fools? Please, let the people that want to buy jets for their pastors do so. As you have tied your hope to the white man giving you a better life, they have also tied their hope to their pastors giving them miracles"

    Can you imagine the difference we can make if people put that money towards building roads, schools, and infrastructure. Remember part of Nigeria's problem is people do not pay taxes. And I know it goes back to govt corruption and what not. But then again, if the govt is corrupt, why doesn't the church take the initiative to differentiate itself from the govt by using the money for public good? What good do we get out of private jets? More environmental pollution and bragging pastors? Well, if that is you and other Nigerians' definition of good, then so be it.

    3)."Dear NID, why is it that whenever I ask you about the solution to this country you claim you do not care about, but can never stop talking about, you tell me the only solution is to split? Unity or splitting - which of the options would cost more?"

    People talk about splitting because we haven't seen the government do much or anything to mitigate the current ethnic tensions. Splitting will come at a price. But also remember that staying together for the past few decades has also come at a price. A price that most likely outweighs the price of separation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hehe, madam prism, I should write more posts like this so I can get more comments from you, lol.

      I agree with almost everything you typed - almost.

      1. People write and people talk and complain everyday. In fact all talk and no action is what has gotten us where we are, so you can't say people don't talk

      2. I never defended that point, saying it is good. I said some people tied their hopes to it. I mentioned it as an analogy.

      3. Here is where I would disagree with you completely. The cost of splitting Nigeria is higher than its unity - so high that you won't even begin to imagine who would survive it. Do you wanna come down here and help pay it? I guess not.

      All in all, please, read the letter again. Its underlying message is not about the points you brought out, but that even though we have issues in this country, some NIDs should sapping the hopes of NINs, which they are fond of doing. Abi how does sucking people's hope change the situation of things in Nigeria?

      Delete
  4. From my experience, I should also add that I think the fundamental difference between a NID and Nigerian in Nigeria is the value we place on each life. The average Nigerian in Nigeria will hear a story that gunmen killed 5 people in the north for playing chess (true story by the way. Happened last week or so) and bat their eyelids like say nothing happen because they have accepted the status quo as their "new normal." A NID will hear the same story and think of how justice must be done, the family of those affected, the direction the country is taken, what should be done to prevent other similar future attacks, etc. #justsaying.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And you think we don't think of all what you mentioned? We live in a country where there is hardly any justice, and our hands are thereby tied in many ways. That alone calls for many people to lose hope, and wait for a messiah to help them. You think that is easy?

      I bet you know that many of us are not insensitive as you might think us to be, and still value life. What of the numerous Nigerians that help save lives everyday, the ones that rescue others from mob attacks that could have led to a similar story of ALUU four, the ones that risk their lives to save people dying of poverty in the slums? Of course, you won't mention those, cos either you don't get to hear such stories or you choose to ignore them, and just publish the few bad ones that happen.

      Not all Nigerians in Nigeria are bad, insensitive, or don't value lives. #justsaying.

      Delete
    2. You're absolutely right. But then again, I didn't say "all Nigerians in Nigeria." I said the "average Nigerian in Nigeria." The bottom line is NIN and NID have different frames of reference :). One is from a "my hands are tied, I can't do nothing" perspective, and another is from a "yes, we can" perspective. One way in which we are similar is that neither group has done the most important thing, which is taking disruptive action. The 2012 fuel protest is the closest we've come to anything.

      Delete
    3. Lol, Okay ooo, I hear. Thanks for engaging me in this debate, and making sensible points. In the mean time, let some NIDs cool down on their hope-sucking statements.

      Delete
  5. *stands up and claps*
    Whoa! Interesting writeup @ilola.

    When I hear talks about splitting I just smh,cos that is not and would never be the solution to any of the many problems in Nigeria.

    I can imagine how being/living in a country where taxes are paid and the system works can make one want to give up hope on a supposedly 'dead end' like Nigeria...but those living in Nigerian need that hope...!

    I always say Nigeria is a country fearfully and wonderfully made by God,even with all its grave issues.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we really need that hope, really really. That is the whole point of the letter, not to keep pointing out that we are bad. We know that already, just give us reason to keep believe, rather than suck up all we have left.

      Delete
  6. atilola, you have made some valid points. Good writing.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Atilola,
    I see your points. yes I do come across some very negative comments form Nigerians about Nigeria. Prism isnt as guilty as she thinks she is. Terrible issues are brought to fore by bloggers because you see the issues carried in the news and it just waka passes. I talk to my family and even my most news savvy sister doesn't know or can't be bothered. I have been there and I understand. What with traffic, power outages, it is easy to be focused on only immediate matters and extended family at the most and forget to be vigilant about nation building. About political matters.

    Just 2 days ago in my church, a circular was being passed around, for people to write to the local councillor protesting their move to stop free transportation to school for children who live a certain distance from their school. It only affected 40 kids but you should see the passion with which the letter was written and the zeal with which parishoners appended their signatures. Yes letter writing works in this country but more than that people still believe they have power to cause change.

    I have chosen activism in my own little way not to show up Nigeria in a bad light but hopefully to prick consciences. If a post from a political blogger/activist/NID/Nigerian Hater leads one Nigeria in Nigeria to rethink an opinion, challenge a status quota or ask how can we do this better than their job is done.

    The greater sin is for someone to abuse you and say you are dirty and you say 'Yes I love doti. let me be'.

    I am Nigerian. I love my Fatherland and will keep on doing whatever I can to help.

    Great Post Atilola and well done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We need to be more proactive in Nigeria, don't mind us. Many people love their lives more than anything else, including me, lol. But one day, we would not be able to escape it again.

      Thanks.

      Delete
  8. Replies
    1. So you are just noticing? Stale gal. Funny enuf, no one has ever pointed out to me that they noticed sef.

      Delete
    2. I noticed oh, when my old bookmark didn't work. (Y)

      Delete
  9. Hmmm! I dropped my comment on the facebook post so ditto on this one. Nigeria is one country I believe God specially created. For those who talk od splitting, I don't blame. The situation in Nigeria today that even I would really not give a hoot if we eventually split. If marriage cannot work then let's try divorce nau! But again, I don't agree with the split-thinking advocates again because if we were going to actually split, we would have done so a long time ago. Nigeria is too rugged to crumble jor! Nigeria has an everlasting shock-absorber so no shaking! Nice one, Atilola!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? I don't think I noticed your comment on facebook. Splitting Nigeria no go work. For it to work, it would even require more work than keeping it together would.

      Delete
  10. I believe in Nigeria... Whatever that is translated to. I refuse to give up, and thus i refuse to debate on how 'worthless' she is. I just jejely hold on to my belief in my own corner doing my own part however insignificant it may seem...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hold on to what you believe. It is your right.

      Delete
  11. Hmmm! I dropped my comment on the facebook post so ditto on this one. Nigeria is one country I believe God specially created. For those who talk of splitting, I don't blame them. The situation in Nigeria today is so bad that even I would really not give a hoot if we eventually split. If marriage cannot work then let's try divorce nau! But again, I don't agree with the split-thinking advocates because if we were going to actually split, we would have done so a long time ago. Nigeria is too rugged to crumble jor! Nigeria has an everlasting shock-absorber so no shaking! Nice one, Atilola!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Replies
    1. you are free to differ. You won't be the first, but you would be one of the very few minority. lol

      Delete
    2. My Opinion:

      http://theaternotes-naija.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/dear-atilola-nigerian-in-nigeria.html

      Delete
  13. Hahaha. This is a very interesting and necessary topic to write about. Although expect trouble from some people o.lol.
    Speaking to the NIDs in question, if you must speak about something, speak with an intention to make a difference and also speak from a point of view of actually caring and not to gloat. Anyone that will wish ill for Nigeria doesn't actually have family or friends back home I would say (or doesn't care about them). Everywhere has its problems and no where is immune from trouble. We all just have to keep praying for wherever we find ourselves and also we have to keep praying for our country. In the end, Nigeria is still our home.
    That said, I think you should also balance this post by writing one for Nigerians in Nigeria (NIN) or maybe get a guest poster in the diaspora to do so.lol. A lot of NINs think that all NIDs are 'slaves' for the white man, paying taxes, washing plates, driving taxi, etc. When they say this, it annoys me cause it sometimes reeks of bitterness. I mean, ok, even if the person is washing plates, what is wrong with making an honest living? What is wrong with paying taxes? Do those governments not do what they are supposed to be doing? And also, everyone shouldn't be lumped in the same boat as well cause a lot of NIDs are actually doing very well for themselves.
    I always tell people to live and let live. Everyone has a choice of what to do, where to live, etc. Some people's choices are made by chance happenings, others are made deliberately. Whichever way, its a choice and should be respected. if opinions are sought, give it objectively and with respect but not with the intent of imposing your choices on others.
    I better stop here before I right my own post right here. lol.I would love to write more because I love Naija and can carry that country on my head sometimes but Ive just decided to tone down jare.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol. You have written you own post already na. Maybe you should write the letter to NIN, not me. We NINs can be very annoying with our selfish, all talk and no action, attitude. NINs need a major mindshift. If I start ehn, I won't finish, so jejely leave me and write the letter. But I know that not all NINs think you are the white man's slave sha o. Many of them want to come over to the white man's golden land, but they don't have the opportunity.

      Delete
  14. Please put some blame on the Media too. those who deliver the news and the way and manner its been delivered.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Its true o. People always say its bad news that sells, but sometimes, we the media should just cool it a bit and try to be a little balanced.

      Delete
    2. True coz Nigeria is alot scarier to those outside than inside..

      Delete
  15. I beg to differ.

    Also NIN might not realize how insecure it is. On my last trip back home in december, I couldn't sleep in the plane, had a terrible headache and my heart rate increased with every mile closer to Lagos the plane got. I was very worried thinking about being robbed , kidnapped or anything. Mind you, just a few weeks before my trip, my aunt and her husband got robbed in VGC there and they took her away in the car to rob other locations. These things are real but NIN have adopted an "e go better" attitude and don't see the situation as terribly as NID do.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. NINs might not realise how insecure it is here? Did you just type that? I would just ignore that statement and believe you did not make it.

      You had a terrible headache on the plane cos you were coming to lagos, thinking about being robbed, kidnapped or anything. That is the problem right there.
      So cos your aunt was robbed, you expected to be robbed, abi, and thereby developed headache. So what if I go to Sandy town connecticut today? Should I say because my niece was in the mass shooting that occured, I expect to be in a mass shooting there too? I hope you get my analogy.
      These thing are real everywhere, not just Nigeria. Everywhere has its issues.
      I like the fact that you were able to avoid the main point of the letter, but point to us the fact that you were afraid to come here cos your aunt was robbed. You have proved my point.

      Delete
    2. My dear, in as much as we have mass shootings on the increase, do they occur as frequently as you get robbed in Nigeria? Would the police respond if they are called? Would the vigilante that disturb your ears every hour respond?

      And yes indeed I did get robbed in traffic and the aftermath was not as traumatic as when I was younger because this time around I was prepped mentally.

      In as much as NID might tend to blow issues out of proportion, it still does not change the fact that on leaving home, adapting back to the way of life or looking at issues the same way you did when you were in would be highly different.

      Delete
    3. Beautiful lady. It is a known fact everywhere that the rate of robbery has reduced in nigeria in the recent years, but of course, you would not mention that. Sorry about your experience sha, so unfortunate, but you were already expecting it sha, and I guess u werent disappointed.

      So after all you have said, would you please stop expecting the worse of nigeria. That is if you not part of the people who claim not to care anymore.

      Just in case u think i am living im denial of how bad our issues are, which is what you keep mentioning, please, read the letter again.

      Delete
  16. I honestly don't like talking too much about nigeria, but I believe in the country and my sis keeps asking why I don't want to travel.... For some reason, I just believe in the country. Valid points made! (Y)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Talking about Nigerian all the time is enough to land one in hospital, its so sickening, what we face here sometimes.

      One advice, if you have an opportunity to travel for education or some other great opportunity, and feel God is leading you there, please, do it. Then come back and use the expertise you have acquired to make this place better, lol.

      Delete
  17. #sigh. I've been doing a lot of that lately so let me just say something. This a thought provoking post and i get the point.

    I think i'm guilty of the point Prism made about batting eyelashes (metaphorically) when i hear horror stories and adopt a siddon-look attitude. Don't get me wrong, i do what i can in any way i can but i noticed a while back that i was getting a little numb to the woes of Nigeria and that is not because i live a shielded life. God knows i worry among other things about Boko Haram visiting the South West and unleashing terror there too. Thing is, i have heard these stories, all ending in eventual silence that i get too angry and sad and helpless and furious. It's the helplessness that i think is killing my 'care' one cell at a time

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Madam, what you have done is develop a coping strategy to the problem. Whenever faced with a challenge, people develop different coping strategies. Some complain, some keep quiet, so start taking action, some steal, some kill, some become leaders hoping to make a change, etc.

      I don't blame you at all. Shebi we are all here and see what is happening.

      Delete
  18. I'm glad you mentioned that you're not generalising all Nigerians in diaspora.
    I agree with some of your points and some just sound very 'interesting' for lack of a less aggravative words.

    To all their own. Everyone has their reasons for moving out or staying put in Nigeria. That doesn't mean that it's okay for NID to belittle Nigeria or those that decided to stay put, though sometimes, it gets hard to just shut up and say 'it is well'. It doesn't also give NIN the right to run down those who for their personal reasons have decided to up and move it. If only everyone will accept and respect each other's choices and decisions.

    Anyway, I am really glad that you did not generalise all NID.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One thing I hate in my life is generalisation. I hate it more than anything, and believe many people in the world have been wrongly affected by it. 'All Nigerians are scam artists' is one disturbing one.

      Thank God you got the point of the letter. We should all accept one another's choice, and not try to belittle one another.

      Delete
  19. This is a very important post.I like the points that you raised and they're very valid.However,our own 'media' is another issue.They project Nigeria in a very very unpleasant and obnoxious light.At a point i actually stopped taking any interest in the news (right now i still don't watch the news,i'd rather read cos i can filter then) and the reason is because you'd rarely see any up-side to leaving in this country.However,i'd also want to re-iterate to our NID that it's not as bad as it is portrayed,i mean,we're here and alive,aren't we?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yea. Bad news sell all the time. However we need to tell good news too, cos we are gonna kill our image if we don't provide a balanced view.

      Delete
    2. 'I still don't watch the news,I'd rather read cos i can filter then'
      I am so with you on that.

      Delete
  20. Dear Nigerian In Nigeria, you sure can write. You are so talented!!!
    Your pen power can pull down strong holds o. take it easy I beg o.
    Well done @ilola!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks ma. I hope you got the message.

      Delete
  21. My opinion:

    http://theaternotes-naija.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/dear-atilola-nigerian-in-nigeria.html

    ReplyDelete
  22. I think I commented on a post inspired by this post and only just seeing this. I think all the points have been made on the letter. My own is, let us not fold our hands, whether NID or NIN, do something.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True, the relevant word in your statement being 'do something'.

      Delete
  23. This is a very thought provoking one.

    Yes, Nigeria is in a mess right now but I believe, talk about,hope, do what I can and pray for a better Nigeria and yes its happening in my life time.

    Thanks for writing this, I think NIN and NID needs to hear this often. Bless your heart!

    ReplyDelete
  24. @Ilola, Yes, your write up is extremely thought provoking but it provokes my thought in a very negative way. Why would NIDs' be a problem to you? Because if I undertsnad well, this write up is addressed to us and I am extremely diasspoitend that there are people who think the way you do. I must say, your facts are too wrong to be significant. I'm quite surprised that so many people are commenting with these positive quotes, but I think I can understand as many of these quotes shove the actual base of the write up to one side and concentrate on the problems Nigeria has as oppose to the one your creating. Fair enough, some Nigerians are exactly how you proclaim but I can guarantee you thats a very very very small minority (Probably the ones you've been in contact with)

    The NIDs like myself who I know and are countless, and never have I come accross one like you've mentioned. I must say write ups like yours' creates divisions and probably unintended harm. NIDs I know find it hard not being in their country, however, everyone has his reason for not being at home and I beleive that should be respected. I beleive I speak for the majority when I say, we NIDs constantly strive and dream of that future where we can be a huge part in the success of our country by adapting our external exposure and diverse experience to our country, to create similar success to that which have been recorded in verious parts of the world.

    I personally beleive that "To be the best, you have to learn from the best" and then you can be a better best. I'm in no way condemning your article but I'll surely like you to indulge in some more research and engage in working with and not against NIDs.

    The Nigerian population is over 170 million, I wont be surprised if you've been exposed to the minority, however, this is the wake up call for you to understand that, there's a lot of us out here for whatever reason, who cannot wait to be back home to use the exposure we have gained to better our country.

    Apologies if any part of my message might have pricked a wrong nerve but it had to be said.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. NIDs are not a problem to me.

      Yes, the letter is addressed to NIDs, but as I stated, it is not a generalisation. Sorry about your 'disappointment' in people that think like me, but judging from the reaction this letter generated across several social network, majority of Nigerians (both NIDs and NINs) apparently think like me.

      My 'facts' are wrong? Please, read the letter again. The things I stated are not assumptions, and are not as a result of talking to a minority NIDs. Most of my family and friends are NIDs, I live with them from time to time, I play and talk with a wise range of them, so I know my 'facts', but as I said, this letter is not a generalisation, but it is the truth.

      You won't be surprised if I have been exposed to the minority of over 170 million? Which minority are we talking about here? How many people can a person possible know out of 170 million?

      I don't work or have anything against NIDs, cos if you know anything about me, you would understand that most of my network and personal connections are NIDs.

      Please, I would like you to read the letter again, and read your comment. I see no correlation o.

      For more clarification, you can read my reply to the letter T.Note's replied me with in this post.

      http://theaternotes-naija.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/dear-atilola-nigerian-in-nigeria.html

      Delete
  25. ... Nice piece ma'am. Greater Chimamanda adichie in the making.
    Tnx for nt generalising. Like someone rightly said, there need to be a piece for NIN. Looking frward to that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aww, thanks for the compliment. I really appreciate it. You can check the link above for T.Notes's response to me as a NIN.

      Delete
  26. lol.. deep debates.. strong views. but I bet ati gets a field day reading and replying.haha

    Nice post, quite thought provoking...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol. Sometimes, it would be nice for everyone to agree with me, so replying can be easier, but what a boring world it will be if everyone thinks like me.

      Delete
  27. Thought provoking and straight from the heart.lol, Who vex you na Atilola. I would do something for my country anyways. That's the only way to spark that change, no matter how little.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Am not vexing o. Just writing from what I noticed over a period of time.

      Delete
  28. Hmmmmm.....first time I am commenting on your posts. Just to give you some perspective from a NID's side. Before I left Nigeria, there was a lot I believed cannot be changed, a lot I saw and adopted as a way of life because I had not seen better. I also believed that the White man's land worked because of a rather sophisticated way of life. Truth is, their life is pretty simpler than ours back home and as a NID, the first thing that strikes you is the potential we have back home and how much we are wasting it on useless things! You also realize how all the things the white man has achieved boils down to perspective and outlook in life.....not by doing anything spectacular! I believe most NIDs see this and that is why they scream at all the things that happen back home. Yes, bad things happen in the white man's land but the sensitivity they channel towards their issues doesn't exist back home and that clearly marks the difference between solving a problem and living with one! That said, things can be made better back home not by ranting about the issues all day or by ignoring them....but by reversing our mentality and working towards a solution.

    About Nigeria splitting or not splitting, the sentiments towards each are clearly shifting with time. if we decide to look back on the history of Nigeria and compare it with her current direction, you will see no difference. Till you lose your life and family to the indiscriminate acts of people especially in the North, you will hardly understand. I was born there, we had to move when i was little because of the killings. I lost uncles and great friends to that madness. I have also waited and prayed for the day when justice would be done or when our government will make things right....and of course, that ain't happening. Rather more families are being wasted and each time, nothing is done to reprimand the killers or compensate families of the deceased. We cannot deny our diverse cultural heritage! We cannot assume that we can treat our group with disdain and wickedness and expect Nigeria to stay together. At some point, they will start fighting back. It's been 49 years since 2 million Nigerians were killed and yet, nothing has been done to heal that wound, rather, more people from the same region are killed in thousands yearly as if they are sacrificial lambs whose blood most be spilled for the sake of the nation. Speak for yourself on Nigeria splitting my dear....those sentiments like I said are heating up to an uncontrollable point.

    Then again, things can still work in Nigeria, but as a realist, I must add....if we start changing things now! I am no pentecostal and so I have no love for wishy washy christianity like is practiced back home! I like facing facts and tackling problems head on!

    I like your article though and one thing I will take from it is that people should start working towards a solution rather than complain all the time. For me, I love to take inspiration from Fashola, the governor of lagos state who has done things people believed could not be done in Lagos. My recent trips back home have kept me wishing for a day when I will get to talk with him....there is a lot to learn from that man and if only He will run for President....I will travel home to cast my vote for him! Once again, we need to start working on solutions.....everyone! we all have a part to play....NIDs and NINs alike!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yea, I wish I could have Fashola run for president too, but many peeps that don't want to see a radical change will oppose it.

      Apart from North vs South, there are many things heating up in Nigeria, and I see a day when people will get tired and fight back, but I will never see Nigeria splitting. Along what lines are we gonna split? The cost of splitting is far far higher than the cost of unity, I continue to say.

      Thanks for dropping by, and commenting.

      Delete
  29. Great post @ilola, I saw the link via Lara's blog. I agree with everything you have to say, however, I have no opinion and I don't like to get myself involved in debating about Nigeria because I feel powerless. I also try to tune myself out of conversations where NIDs are bashing Nigeria and saying negative things about it. I think Nigeria needs riots like those in North African for a change to actually happen. Till then, we'll just sit and wait and hope for God to send our Moses to rescue us.

    ReplyDelete
  30. My only problem with this post is that I am just reading it in November!
    It should have been part of my shots in the arm to get through the year and not die from NID ash on the internet - particularly on the Nigeria Nostalgia Project!

    ReplyDelete

What's your opinion on this? Let's learn from one another.

Related Posts with Thumbnails